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Here are some illustrations I’ve been looking at as inspiration for a basis for my scrimshaw and pyrography work.

Amanda Nedham

Lisa Solomon

Nic di Genova 

After some experiments with hand techniques, I got thinking that it might be nice to try some mechanical engraving (perhaps in combination) on my bone pieces. I have designed some engraving patterns to be CNC milled into some bone pieces – more next post on that. 

 

i vote for art is an online boutique where artists and designers can sell their works interantionally. It works in a similar format to Etsy, and has a cute feature which allows the general public to vote on favourite works by the click of a button.

It’s a very sweet concept, but I kind of wish it wasn’t limited to 2D works – artists may sell original paintings, and limited or open edition prints – but I suppose drawing the line around 3D works is more complicated, and risks treading on the toes of etsy…

Nonetheless, its always wonderful to see fledgling galleries offering this kind of publicity to independent artists. 🙂

      

Joshua Davis is a New York-based artist/designer/graphismo who (among other things) uses generative code to create digital compositions of incredible complexity and individuality. 

Tropism is an exhibition which is the collaborative result of Davis and design studio Commonwealth, featuring a series of porcelain vases imprinted with unique graphic elements.

Davis’ element of the works involved the creation of drawn elements based on images of dissections from a 1908 book called “Types of Floral Mechanics”, which were fed into a generative algorithm, creating highly intricate digital illustrations, some of which were used for hi-res digital inkjet prints, and others printed onto transfers which were applied to the vases during the firing process.

The vases were created by Commonwealth using Maya (a 3D modelling program) and a stereolithographic 3D print of the object was created, in order to derive a mould for slip-casting.

The resulting objects are a collision of technology and organic form, reminiscant of grafted plants and fractal divisions. The sheer materiality of the porcelain and the soft, nature-derived colour scheme of Davis’ illustration makes the works immediately inviting, defying the usual cold preconception of digitally-derived objects.

Interestingly, Davis’ use of colour is actually derived from nature. In an interview on the Apple – Pro website, Davis states, 

“I take a lot of digital photographs just to extract color. I go to an arboretum here on Long Island at different points in the year and take pictures of the orchid show or the Christmas poinsettias. Nature does a pretty good job of blending. You’ll get a flower that starts with green, goes up to yellow, and blooms red. So already I’ve got a red, a yellow, and a green that all complement each other… 

I take that image and run it through this program I’ve created, and say, ”Okay, extract the top 16 colors.” So now I have a range of colors extracted out of the image that I blended. The most complex color set I’ve done was 74 colors, and the average is 32.”

I find this idea of ‘digital materiality’ really compelling, especially in the forms of object design and wearables. Commonwealth describe themselves as “harnessing a new fluidity applicable to both the brutality of Architecture and the minutia of the graphic arts” as a point of departure for their design firm. This philosophy reminds me of one of my favourite projects by Dutch wunderkind Dinie Besems.

Tropism via Generator.x

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