You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘exhibition’ category.

I am pleased to announce the launch of my work into the Craft ACT shop!

For those Canberra locals who haven’t seen or heard of this exciting place — I urge you to visit! Located in Civic Square on London Cct, Craft ACT exhibits some of the region (and Australia’s) most amazing makers. They have an exciting and dynamic exhibition schedule within their two gallery spaces, and have recently launched the new Craft ACT shop! The shop features works from local makers — textiles, glass, ceramics, jewellery, objects and publications. All products are designed by talented craftspeople and handmade, so by buying up you’re supporting independent makers.

I have submitted some teacup rings and wireframe neckpieces, the latter including stainless steel, sterling silver and 24k gold plated brass, all on oxidised sterling silver chain. You can see some examples of this series here, and learn about the teacup rings here.

My works will be in the ‘crucible showcase’ at the entrance to Craft ACT until Saturday 22nd May, at which point they will enter the shop. They are available as “cash and carry” so you can buy one from the display and take it home on the spot! What more could I ask or??

Here are the installation shots from my 2009 graduating show.

I made an extension to the Picnic Gems series (of early 2009) and created some more wearables derived from my earlier experiments with wireframes and goatskin parchment.

I apologise that the shots aren’t great — most of the pieces were sold (hence the little sticker dots everywhere) and I didn’t get a chance to shoot them using the flash. Thanks to all of those wonderful buyers out there! This really renewed my working vigour.

I’ll shortly be sending out pieces to a few suppliers, so stay tuned! I’m also working on some more costume-y pieces for my etsy store, which includes a bit of an overhaul/rebrand.

In 2010 I’ll be completing an honours years at ANU, so my next major project will involve refining a concept and further material explorations. Watch this space…

Well, after a heavy 5 months of work in Düsseldorf, I am finally home, armed with plenty of new work and experience. I have some pieces in a group show, called “Freshly Sealed“, in the Netherlands. This show includes the work of my classmates, with whom I collaborated to make the show happen. The aim of the project was to design and create a completely new range of products for exhibition and sale, which complemented our earlier body of work.

Having previously worked with melamine teacups, I resigned myself to explore further design possibilities using vintage melamine crockery, which led me to the technique of embedding layers of material (i.e. stacked plates or bowls) in coloured opaque resin. Finished with sterling silver, I produced a range of brooches and earrings for the show. These “picnic gems” are hand cut and carved from the large ‘rocks’ of material.

Currently, I am working on some new rings using this technique in combination with grenadilla wood and reclaimed Corian.

Below are the images of the works I submitted. Freshly Sealed runs until 18th October, at Galerie Agnes Raben.

This course is also run by Dutch designer Herman Hermsen, and involves the design and execution of an exhibition of student work – small-scale series production available for sale. Part of the theory behind this exhibition is that during times of economic instability, buyers are less likely to invest in expensive, one-off artworks, while simultaneously being skeptical of mass-produced goods from large-scale manufacturers.

For the maker, this opens up a niche – handmade pieces from independent designers at a reasonable price point are now more desirable to the market.

The exhibition has 9 student participants, mostly final-year or masters students (which makes me more than amateur…) who are each developing their own marketable range of products – wearables, accessories or decor pieces.

So how can we make a coherent exhibition out of this broad range of work? It seems that the contemporary jewellery scene is the only place where it is commonplace to exhibit production pieces. Of course, the dichotomy of exhibiting jewellery is that it almost negates the function of the pieces themselves — what is a piece of jewellery if it is behind glass, without a body, a wearer, a life? It becomes and empty object, the dialogue of the piece is changed, overlooked.

To me, these pieces need to communicate something about their context. For me, there is a constant struggle to justify my making production pieces in a world that is already flooded with products. Empty objects, only given purpose by the consumer, to be returned to emptiness once the next-gen designs appear.

The concept of inbuilt obsolescence in products keeps me awake at night. Perhaps this is why a can empathise with the works of makers like Karen Ryan, Marc Monzo and Denise Reytan.

In order to deal with these anxieties, I find myself drawn to forgotten objects as a basis for my work. Jewellery, being a highly personal and communicative medium, seems an apt place for re-contextualising these ‘lost’ objects. At the same time as making production pieces, I want to subvert the concept of mass-production itself. But how?

For the last 3 years or so, I’ve been working on an ongoing production series of ‘Teacup rings’. These rings are constructed from the handles of second-hand melamine teacups which were in production in Australia between the 1950s-1970s. During this time, melamine was a fashionable material for kitchenalia, picnic ware and crockery. I buy the cups from op-shops, garage sales and estate sales. Each wearable piece is hand-carved and unique. The shapes in the pieces reference the original lines of the products from which they are derived, as well as the natural movements of my tools when I carve. If you are interested, the pieces are available from Workshop Bilk.

I’ve decided I will keep working along this theme, using vintage plastics from abandoned mass-produced objects. Aesthetically, I like the concept of referencing the original forms. I have begun a few experiments, but more on that soon.

I’m also in charge of the graphic design/marketing team for this exhibition, this means there’ll be logo/identity design, packaging, promotional material, website and installation work to follow, too. 

      

Joshua Davis is a New York-based artist/designer/graphismo who (among other things) uses generative code to create digital compositions of incredible complexity and individuality. 

Tropism is an exhibition which is the collaborative result of Davis and design studio Commonwealth, featuring a series of porcelain vases imprinted with unique graphic elements.

Davis’ element of the works involved the creation of drawn elements based on images of dissections from a 1908 book called “Types of Floral Mechanics”, which were fed into a generative algorithm, creating highly intricate digital illustrations, some of which were used for hi-res digital inkjet prints, and others printed onto transfers which were applied to the vases during the firing process.

The vases were created by Commonwealth using Maya (a 3D modelling program) and a stereolithographic 3D print of the object was created, in order to derive a mould for slip-casting.

The resulting objects are a collision of technology and organic form, reminiscant of grafted plants and fractal divisions. The sheer materiality of the porcelain and the soft, nature-derived colour scheme of Davis’ illustration makes the works immediately inviting, defying the usual cold preconception of digitally-derived objects.

Interestingly, Davis’ use of colour is actually derived from nature. In an interview on the Apple – Pro website, Davis states, 

“I take a lot of digital photographs just to extract color. I go to an arboretum here on Long Island at different points in the year and take pictures of the orchid show or the Christmas poinsettias. Nature does a pretty good job of blending. You’ll get a flower that starts with green, goes up to yellow, and blooms red. So already I’ve got a red, a yellow, and a green that all complement each other… 

I take that image and run it through this program I’ve created, and say, ”Okay, extract the top 16 colors.” So now I have a range of colors extracted out of the image that I blended. The most complex color set I’ve done was 74 colors, and the average is 32.”

I find this idea of ‘digital materiality’ really compelling, especially in the forms of object design and wearables. Commonwealth describe themselves as “harnessing a new fluidity applicable to both the brutality of Architecture and the minutia of the graphic arts” as a point of departure for their design firm. This philosophy reminds me of one of my favourite projects by Dutch wunderkind Dinie Besems.

Tropism via Generator.x

   

Sydneysiders have been lucky enough to have experienced a multitude of exhibitions of contemporary metalsmiths, jewellers and object designers at Surry Hills studio-gallery Metalab over the last few years. Metalab was opened in 2004 by ANU School of Art graduate Cesar Cueva (above centre and right). Now, their sister store Courtesy of the Artist is about to reach it’s two year anniversary.

Courtesy stocks a wide range of contemporary wearables and objects from many Australian and international designers and artists like Cinnamon Lee, Mark Vaarwerk, Vanessa Samuels (above left) and F!NK. The vivacous Nina Cueva, owner of the store, hand picks the objects and artists. Nina’s vast amount of experience and craft knowledge ensures her range is not only fresh and innovative, but of superior handmade quality.

Courtesy is located at 547 Bourke St, Surry Hills, NSW. Definitely one for the inner-city-gallery crawl. 🙂

fiona-hall-skull.jpg
Fiona Hall
Understorey 1999-2004
glass beads, silver wire, rubber, boar’s teeth

Before Damien Hirst pave-set a platinum skull, there was Fiona Hall.

The Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney is currently holding an exhibiton by Australian contemporary artist Fiona Hall. Fiona Hall: Force Field runs from March 6 until June 1.

Hall’s  work explores social, political, environmental and economic concerns through a a diverse range of media including photography, sculpture, painting, installation. Hall exalts everyday objects and simultaneously subverts the plastic economies from which they emerge.

I found this exhibiton really inspiring and insightful. Hall’s often tongue-in-cheek approach to serious issues is really accessible, her works don’t drown in obscure meaning or pretentiousness.
Go and see it!

Also, keep your calendar free for Southern Exposure, featuring works from the San Diego MCA from the likes of Barbara Kruger, Ed Ruscha and Bill Viola. Runs from March 20 until June 1.

a

History.

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

support the blog

Flickr stream

afternoon

flowers

love

More Photos

numbers.

  • 128,048 visitors since March 08